WHEN IT ALL COMES TOGETHER

•November 9, 2014 • 2 Comments

There is that rare occasion when all of the photography elements seem to converge to really assist in the making of a very good image.  I have to say, this is a perfect example of what I’m talking about.  The late afternoon lighting was perfect.  There were just enough high clouds to provide creative interest for the sky.  The river was calm creating a reflection in the foreground that was free from any distracting rippling.  The subject…well, it’s Yosemite.

Looking at this image makes all the work it took to capture it fade away.

It is Half Dome in all of its beauty!

YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK - HALF DOME WEB

THE SIGHTS ALONG THE WAY

•November 6, 2014 • 2 Comments

On the shores of Bass Lake sits this quaint wedding garden.  I was intrigued by the sky on this particular afternoon.

THE WEDDING GARDEN - YOSEMITE

Driving into Yosemite National Park provides a plethora of images that compel you to stop.  A wedding garden. A 120 year old church, a grove of trees and brush, and lots of fall color!

 

 

YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK - FIELD OF COLOR

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK - INTO THE FALL 1 WEB_edited-1

YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK - COUNTRY CHURCH WEB

 

INTO THE HEART OF YOSEMITE

•November 3, 2014 • Leave a Comment

Sometimes, even the obvious shots are worth capturing – and even necessary.

Such is the case with this image of Yosemite National Park.  This is likely the most famous perspective of the park.  Does that mean I should ignore it.  No!  Not at all.  What is a visit to Yosemite without the most famous “Tunnel View?”

Approximately 16 miles into the park from highway 41, you will come to the famous tunnel.  Upon exiting that tunnel, you will witness quite possibly one of the most magnificent views of any National park in America.

I give you, The Tunnel View.

YPSEMITE NATIONAL PARK - THE TUNNEL VIEW

PHOTOGRAPHY TIP – BE AWARE OF YOUR SURROUNDINGS

•October 30, 2014 • 5 Comments

If I have learned one thing in photography, it’s this: Even though I may know what I’m planning to shoot, if I’m aware of my surroundings I may discover something equally as interesting.  That was exactly the case with this image.  Did I know there was a church along highway 41 about 10 miles from the Yosemite entrance?  No.  I just happened to notice it as I was driving by.  I quickly turned around, and this is one of the images I captured.  This little country church was built in 1894 and is a beautiful example of the simplicity of the churches of this era.

Almost as a bonus, the sunset hour creates the vivid colors of this hewn rock wall.

YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK - COUNTRY CHURCH WEB

Don’t go too far.  I’ll be posting more Yosemite images soon.

INTO THE FALL

•October 29, 2014 • Leave a Comment

This is my first entry from the recent two-day photo shoot in Yosemite National Park.  We wondered if we would be too late to capture the fall color.  Not too far into the park, we had our answer.

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK - INTO THE FALL 1 WEB_edited-1

I hope you’ll come back as I post several shots from the park.  It simply is a photo shoot waiting to happen. Literally, you can just turn around, shoot, and you will likely have a “keeper.”

ANOTHER WASHINGTON LIGHTHOUSE

•October 22, 2014 • 2 Comments

This is Destruction Island Lighthouse, built in 1888 and located in the northwest coastal region of Washington State.

What is really unusual?  You may not have noticed, but this beach consisted of small, very smooth black rocks.  It was pretty amazing to see – a shiny, black beach.

DESTRUCTION ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE

THE BLOOD MOON II

•October 8, 2014 • Leave a Comment

Even though I was unable to photograph this morning’s Blood Moon, I thought I would post my images from the earlier Blood Moon that appeared in April.  Capturing the moon is not that difficult.  However, it is crucial to remember that the moon is an object in motion.  Your first thought might be to lengthen your shutter speed because of the night sky.  But doing this will only make the moon seem elongated, because it is moving.  No, you must shoot at a fast shutter speed and make your adjustments with lens aperture and ISO settings.  Depending on your camera, you should be able to go up to an ISO setting of around 1600.  Depending on your lens, you should be able to utilize at least an aperture setting of 2.8.  The with you camera in Manual mode, expose for the moon rather than the sky.  It is very bright when it is full.  But you will need to definitely adjust your settings if you are attempting an eclipse.  Obviously the more the moon is eclipsed, the dimmer it becomes.

At the beginning of the eclipse, shot at ISO 100, f2.8, 200mm, 1/1000.

ECLIPSE II

Coming out of the eclipse as the moon reflects all of the various sunrises and sunsets from the Earth.  During this stage, care must be taken to achieve an adequate exposure as the moon is much dimmer.  This image is ISO 1600, f/2.8, 200mm, 1/30.

ECLIPSE I

Good luck with you moon shots!

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 702 other followers