LOOK CAREFULLY – DO YOU SEE THAT?

When I posted this shot a few weeks ago, it was actually one of my favorite images from Zion National Park.  I liked the colors and the way the shadow was framing the image.  I also liked the cloud formations in the sky.  But, when I began to scrutinize it for enlargement, I discovered something I had missed before.  I captured this perspective from the base of “The Weeping Rock.”  I had climbed to a higher elevation to get this shot and others, as well.  Now, this area is so named for a reason.  That’s right, the rock seems to be weeping, which creates an environment similar to a very light rain.  Because I was actually sheltered from this rain-like effect, I never gave it a thought.  If you click to enlarge the image, you will notice some streaks that appear only in the sky (I think – if they’re in the mountainous terrain, they don’t seem to be noticeable).  So now, I wonder if this shot is even salvageable.

 

The Altar of Sacrifice as seen from beneath The Weeping Rock

 

 

What do you think?  What would you do?  Is this image ruined by the streaks?  Can they be edited out?  What editing process would you use?  Should they be edited out?  Do you think a 16×20 enlargement of this image would be scrutinized because of this flaw?  Should I just scrap the shot and move on?

I know some of you may be uneasy leaving a comment – I understand that.  But maybe this time you would be willing to make an exception.  I’m really needing your feedback on this one.  Even if you’re not a photographer, if you like mountain landscapes – would you consider purchasing this picture?

Let me know what you think!

Thanks!

PS – Thank you for wishing me a speedy recovery from my near pneumonia encounter.  While I am not completely well, I am feeling better each day!

Advertisements

~ by photographyfree4all on February 7, 2011.

50 Responses to “LOOK CAREFULLY – DO YOU SEE THAT?”

  1. Glad you’re on your way to a full recovery – being sick is NO fun!! I took a good look at the enlarged photo, and what I would do IF this were a photo that I had taken, is take a soft “spot healing” brush in Photoshop, and brush those little streaks out. I didn’t see too many of them that jumped out at me, and they seem to be in areas that shouldn’t be too difficult to blend away. It is a beautiful photo!!

    Like

  2. I see what you mean, you could try and fix the lines by using the clone stamp tool in Photoshop, it would take quite a while but I guess you could give it a try.

    Like

  3. I like this photo a lot, just the way it is. A 16×20 enlargement may be scrutinized by those who don’t know anything about “The Weeping Rock.” But to those who do, I’d say it’s a one of a kind keeper.

    Like

  4. Didn’t even notice until I clicked for the larger image. Are the streaks rain (or weeping) falling through the shot, or onto your lens?

    Personally, I would leave it in the form it’s in and live with it. Not sure if I’d enlarge the image, but I wouldn’t throw it out either.

    The only critique I’ll offer is that the foreground is very dark. Can you mask this area and try to draw some color out?

    Like

  5. Pressed send before I was really done my thoughts. I really like the image. Especially the sky against the brown cliffs. Nice Work!

    Like

  6. Steve, they can definitely be removed. Magnify the image several times then use the spot healing tool. If I can help give me a holler. You can do it. 🙂

    Bob

    Like

  7. Wow! Do you have another exposure of this scene? If so, you could create an HDR sandwich exposure. Since the falling drops would be in different places, they should disappear in the finished image.
    You could clone it out, but that would take hours.
    You could paste in a new sky, but that would be a shame unless you do it with another shot of the same sky.
    More of a concern might be the bodacious fringing I see at the edge between the mountains and sky. There’s lots of advice for getting rid of it out there.

    Like

  8. If you are going to blow it up and display then I would definitely try and toy with a correction. How to fix it depends on what program you’re using to do your post processing. Most that I have seen have some type of cloning tool that will cover the spots up. If you use photoshop, I recently came across a plug-in called Wire Worm that might be useful to you. You can find it here

    Like

  9. The image is beautiful and as an illustration of the phenomenon, it would get by as it is. However, I think I would clone them out. What bothers me more on enlargement is the ghosting along the edges of the rocks where they meet the sky – red on the dark side and green on the light. That could as well be cloned, but would be more work and poorly done would not be an improvement.

    Like

  10. You know, I like it and would love to know the story as to what is happening in the shot. It’s real – why edit it out? We live in a “perfect” world of fixed images. Keep it and put the story with it when you sell it. 🙂

    Like

  11. I think it is beautiful. There are things in nature, that are intended, by God, to remind us of his majesty, power, and creativity. I would accept it as it is. This is just another one of those reminders, of who He is. Beauty if always in the eye of the beholder, even if others do not agree…..

    Like

  12. Those streaks could be removed with Photoshop. It’s a bit of work but it can be done. As far as selling the picture in large size, i would abstain from it but it could be used for web illustration of book cover and other similar things. The larger the print the more the chances the repairs will leave some uneven area to be seen. Now, some can find it special to see the water drops streaking down from the rock in front of the camera. 🙂

    Like

  13. Yes, the streaks are there and quite noticeable full sized…. I have no idea how I’d remove them… but I’m no post expert either. I have a rule of thumb, however, and that’s if it takes more than a minute or two of tweaking, it’s not worth my time.
    I’d chalk it up as a lesson about paying attention to detail; something I mess up all the time myself. 😉

    Like

  14. Thank you, Holly. It’s good to begin to feel better! I’m so glad you jumped in on this discussion. Follow some of the answers as we tackle this project. I’ll let you know what happens. Thanks!

    Like

  15. Hi Aisling! Thank you for sharing this idea for editing the image! I haven’t decided what to do, but will likely try several of the suggestions – including yours. Thanks for the idea!

    Like

  16. To be honest, this was my first thought. After all, this was the way the scene presented itself from this perspective. But, then I thought about editing and wondered if that might be a better solution. I’m eager to see what everyone thinks – and how many think the way you do! Thanks, Barb! Your thoughts are very much appreciated.

    Like

  17. The streaks are from from falling in front of the shot – as opposed to the lens. I will definitely experiment with the foreground, Nels! Thanks! I like your thought process, too!

    Like

  18. I hate it when I do that! 🙂 Thanks for your kind words!

    Like

  19. Hi Bob! Two people have suggested the spot healing tool. Is that the same thing as the clone stamp? Stay tuned, Bob! There’s a lot of discussion about this. Thanks for jumping in!

    Like

  20. I have to admit, you’re the first person to use the term “Bodacious!” It definitely caught my attention. 🙂 And, you’re right! I’m hoping some other people will jump in on that problem. I’ve done a little research, but haven’t tried anything yet! I really do appreciate that observation. I have more than one image, but I was hand holding the camera and they have to match, don’t they to do HDR? This is a great comment, Steve! You have given me a lot to think about. I really hoping others will read your comments and further this discussion. Thanks!

    Like

  21. Thanks for the tip, Mike! I do use photoshop elements 8, but I haven’t used many of the tools. Two have suggested the cloning tool, while two have suggested the healing brush. I’m not sure if they’re the same thing, or something different. I’ll definitely check out Wire Worm! Thanks for the tip!

    Like

  22. You’re the second person that has mentioned this, Missusk. I appreciate your suggestions. I haven’t tried anything yet, but will be experimenting and reporting back. Stay tuned! Thanks for jumping in with you help!

    Like

  23. I was surprised that some have suggested it makes the image unique in its own right, Dawn! I do like that thinking. I will definitely maintain a copy of the original, even if I do experiment with editing. I do think it would be a good experience for me to try thr editing! I need to learn this photoshop program! 🙂 Great comment. Thanks.

    Like

  24. I like the image as is, knowing (now) that it’s called “the weeping rock.” You’ve captured something unique, and I like the streaks. I’m not familiar with the area, but is that something that can be captured any time? It seems unusual to me, and I’d want to keep it “as is” for that reason.

    But I can also see why you might want to remove the streaks to make the image almost “perfect.” Perfection, in my opinion, is highly overrated.

    Glad to hear you’re feeling better! 😀

    Like

  25. In Photoshop the healing brush is just below the eye-dropper. In Elements it is just above the eraser tool.

    It is similar to the clone, but you just move the tool over the streak, and it disappears and blends in with the surrounding area.

    Bob

    Like

  26. Glad to hear from you, Elena! I must agree with you on this one, too! It is most difficult for me to see tyhe beauty of Zion National Park, or even a sunset at Huntington Beach, California, and not recognize the enormity of God’s creation! I hope you’ll stay tuned for further updates as I promose to keep everyone posted. Thanks for visiting today!

    Like

  27. I think you may have a valid point about enlarging this image with photoshop corrections, Trancis. But, I will possibly try for my own experience. I also agree with using it in a smaller format. I don’t think too many people actually noticed tyhe raindrops when I first posted it – probably because they didn’t think to enlarge it for examination as I suggested this time. I’m so glad you stopped by and shared your comment! It certainly adds to the discussion as you have added a new idea to what has been very enlightening to me! Thanks!

    Like

  28. I believe I committed one of the photographer’s biggest mistakes, Derrick – I was so awestruck by the scenery that I was completely oblivious to the environment of the shoot. I mean, I had covered my camera (and my head) while hiking under the Weeping Rock, but once there I failed to realize a shot from that perspective – while magnificinent – is going to disply with streaks of raindrops. At any rate, this shot was not available from any other angle. So in the long run, what I have may turn out to be better than having nothing – whatever decision I make about the image! Thanks for your honest and up-front take on the whole situation. I had to smile as I was reading it because I could easily relate!! 🙂

    Like

  29. I honestly cannot say if the “weeping” occurs at all times of the year, Robin, or if it happens to be more predominant at certain times. But with the “rest of the story” it does make for an interesting image! I am feeling better – I’m actually in the office today, but taking it slowly! We might find the best photography to fall into that category of containing certain unique imperfections – who knows? 🙂

    Like

  30. Now that’s what I’m talking about, Bob! Just tell me exactly where the little icon is located so I can click it!! 🙂 Finally, someone speaking my language! You know Bob, when it comes to editing – I’m ashamed at my lack of knowledge and experience. This will definitely help me become more familiar with Elements! Thanks so much! It does sound like the healing brush may be a simpler edit. On a side note – I certainly could have used that “Healing Brush” on myself this past week! 🙂

    Like

  31. Overall, I wouldn’t encourage either scrapping this shot, which would be a waste of an excellent photo, or editing the streaks out. If you hadn’t noticed them to start with, that probably means they aren’t problematic to the first impact the image left you with! In fact, I’d say myself that they don’t at all ruin the visual impact and aesthetics of the shot, even when you know they’re there! I tend to go by the principle that you capture the truth that lies in front of you, and unless it particularly ruins the shot, which I don’t think it does in this case, although it doesn’t add anything to it either imo, I’d leave it as it is and consider the streaks as part of the general environment which you captured. Why not promote the streaks as a part of the whole character of the place you’ve captured?
    However, that’s just what I’d do, and in the end I think it’s up to the artist -you- to choose how you treat this image. Therefor my advice would be to make your choice, as an artist, according to your own personal taste and your own personal approach to photography, independantly of what potential buyers think of it! This may sound obvious but I think it’s an all too easy trap to fall into! Of course, this too is just my opinion, so the debate is circular!
    Excellent shot and excellent post as usual, Steve! Nice work!

    Like

  32. I think this photograph stands as it is. Yes you can clone out or smooth out the streaks, but to me that is part and parcel of the image. Title it View at Weeping Rocks and let the viewer decide when he/she sees it printed large. Each person will have an opinion on it (if they even notice it) and that is what will make it interesting to them, added tot he fact that is is already a great image!

    Like

  33. Kai, this is such a detailed comment! I really appreciate that! Well, I really wouldn’t think of scrapping it altogether. In it’s smaller state, it’s a very nice shot. I would at least edit some detail into the shadowed foreground, even if I don’t photoshop the raindrops. You’re exactly right, though. It does present a unique reality of this amazing natural weeping. Thank you for sharing such a great comment. I really hope other readers will see it as well, because it adds so much to the content of the post!! Great job.

    Like

  34. Okay Steve. In the edit window of your Photoshop Elements there is a double vertical row of icons down the left side. There are two icons side-by-side. One looks like a wooden-handled rubber stamp. the othere looks like a school kid’s eraser. Right above that eraser is the “healing brush”. When you click on it your curser will most likely turn into a tiny circle. You can adjust that setting with the adjustments above your picture. Anyway, just put that little circle/curser over the streak, right click, hold it down, and move it over the streak. When you remover your finger from the mouse you will see the streak disappear. You may need to experiment a little with the size of the tool.

    I had suggested that you magnify the picture several times. When you do that, after the correction is made, and you look at the picture in normal size you will see no sign of a repair.

    I hope I didn’t confuse you; If so, send me a direct e-mail with your phone number and tell me when I can call, and I will walk you through it.

    Bob

    Like

  35. Steve, I meant LEFT CLICK. LEFT CLICK!!!!

    Like

  36. You should write a book, Bob! Clear, concise, exact instructions. I’m going to duplicate the image and experiment tonight. Then, I’ll let you know! Thanks for staying tuned in , Bob! All of your comments have helped me to better understand what to do! If I get confused, I’ll let you know! Thanks a bunch!! 🙂

    Like

  37. LOL!! OK…left click!! 🙂

    Like

  38. Steve, one more little hint. If you RIGHT CLICK on any of those icons, it will tell you which is what. 🙂

    Bob

    Like

  39. This has most certainly been an interesting discussion for me! Personally, I would purchase the print in its original setting because it would seem to be unique from all other landscapes!! To me, that makes it more valuable to me! Thank you, Michael, for adding your expertise!! I value your comments and certainly appreciate them! Great job!

    Like

  40. Thanks for all of your help, Bob! IT WORKED!!! I’m going to refine it a little and then post the comparison between the original and the edited versions. I owe you, Bob! 🙂

    Like

  41. LOL!! Hey, Bob! I have the MAC version which actually required a mouse depression only. 🙂

    Like

  42. […] And for those who may be interested, I used the Healing Tool in Photoshop Elements 8 to remove the streaks.  It was quite simple, as explained by Bob Zeller in his comments to me from the previous post.  […]

    Like

  43. First, I do hope you are feeling better. Hubby had pneumonia 2 years ago and by the time he went to the doctor, his left lung was almost completely blocked! Took two rounds of antibiotics, lots of rest and time to fully recover. So take care of yourself!

    I look at photos from two perspectives…as a photographer AND as a printer.

    This is a very nice image – framed and composed beautifully, with fantastic colors. I am not familiar with the subject matter, but just looking at images of ZNP and the AOF, this image appears to be superior to what I am seeing out there. Then, there are the marks. I would remove them.

    Froma printer’s standpoint, the vertical marks would appear as ‘defects’ on the finished print. And potential buyers might not like that. Just like spots on flowers, lint on your lens, etc. John Q Public can be demanding – at least the part that I’ve encountered!

    Like

  44. I am feeling better, Tracy! Thanks! This is a great comment! Lots of information here. I appreciate your perspective from a printer. That’s what I was saying yesterday – I’m afraid it would look like a printing error in its finished state with the streaks. I would like to tap into your printing knowledge. Do you have any recommendations for printing some of my prints…different types of paper? Canvas? Anything out there that’s new and unique? Any help would be amazing! Thanks!! 🙂

    Like

  45. By the way, I love your food photography! I’m planning to experiment with that soon. 🙂

    Like

  46. Hi Steve – the only thing I can tell you about printing is this: it is an art unto itself! It took me many, many, many years to get to the point where what I see on my monitor is what comes out of the printer! I have (3) Epson printers which use Ultrachrome Pigmented Inks. I’ve only really used Epson media and didn’t compare to other forms of paper out there. I primarily print on their Premium Lustre paper as it provides a nice satin finish. I also like to print on canvas as well as fine art papers such as Sommerset Velvet, Textured Fine Art and Ultrasmooth Fine Art.

    If you are going to print yourself, you will need to look into a color calibration systema and color profiles for your printer for whatever media you are printing on. You might find it easier and more cost effective in the long run to find a high-quality printer. Then there’s matting, framing, etc. Hoo boy! 🙂

    Another point about image ‘defects’. You have to keep in mind that, when you are standing there, composing an image, whether it is a landscape or a portrait, there is so much going on that you don’t focus on the flaws. However, once to click that button, making that moment static, the flaws will then jump out at you. This is why portraits are retouched. No one notices the wrinkles and blemishes in person…it is only when looking at a still that you do and we, as photographers, need to retouch the image so the viewer can focus on the beauty and not agonize over the flaws.

    Like

  47. Thanks! The trick is to not EAT your subject! 🙂

    Like

  48. I can see how that would be a temptation, Tracy! But after I’m assured of a good shot – I could go ahead and indulge…couldn’t I? 🙂

    Like

  49. WOW! Thank you for taking the time to respond in such detail, Tracy! What great information! And, no! I’m not planning to do my own printing on anything larger than 8×10 or so. I do have a Canon Pixma Pro 9000, but haven’t used it very much.

    This comment is an education in and of itself! Thank you very much!! 🙂

    Like

  50. […] know!  It sounds simple – but, it’s not so easy to do.  That’s why in a recent post about using the Healing Tool in Photoshop, I simply asked Bob Zeller to walk me through the […]

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: