NOW YOU SEE IT…NOW YOU DON’T – Photography Tip #17

I know you’re probably getting a bit weary of this image, but this discussion has been of tremendous interest to me – and possibly to many of you, as well.  First, I want to express my gratefulness for your comments and suggestions regarding the outcome of this landscape.  You have honestly caused me to think in ways I hadn’t before.

Many of you believe the image is best as it is originally presented – with the raindrops, and I agree with that because I do feel like it presents itself in a unique – but, very real way.  Others felt I should edit the raindrops out, and I must say there are times that I agree with that side of the discussion, too!  How’s that for straddling the fence?  🙂

But now that you can see both versions, some of you may actually change your mind.  So I thought, lets put it to a vote.  That way everyone can express their preference without feeling any pressure one way or the other.  The votes are not tracked, which means even I have no way of knowing who preferred the original version and who would rather see the image edited.

The Altar of Sacrifice - Original

The Altar of Sacrifice - Edited

I do recognize this image requires further editing – even the raindrop edit was completed quickly and needs a bit of refining.  And, I do need to address the fringing issue and would welcome any solutions you may know for that process.  But for the purpose of voting, let’s only consider the editing with the raindrops.  Which image do you prefer?  You will need to click to enlarge the image to make your decision.

And for those who may be interested, I used the Healing Tool in Photoshop Elements 8 to remove the streaks.  It was quite simple, as explained by Bob Zeller in his comments to me from the previous post

  1. Open the image in Photoshop Elements 8
  2. Click on the Zoom Tool, which appears as a magnifying glass in the panel to the left of the image to enlarge the image
  3. Click on the Healing Tool, which appears as a band-aid in the side panel to the left of the image
  4. Your cursor becomes a circle which you now trace over the streak with your mouse depressed (I have a MAC version, so the PC mouse function may be different – possibly a left click)
  5. Voila!  You’re streak is blended into the existing sky

I would encourage you to read all the comments from the past two days.  They were all great!  Especially Steve, who like many of you, pointed out the “Bodacious” fringing!!  🙂  I had to smile when I read his terminology!

Now, it’s time to vote.

WAIT!!!  DON’T LEAVE YET!!!  It only takes a second and requires no information – just a fast click in the box next to your preference followed by a fast click on the vote button!

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~ by photographyfree4all on February 9, 2011.

24 Responses to “NOW YOU SEE IT…NOW YOU DON’T – Photography Tip #17”

  1. Great job, Steve, on removing the streaks. But that halo, the lighted area that outlines everything, seems a bit more intense in the second one.. I don’t know what caused that, not ever seeing the original that came out of the camera. But I suspect that maybe you had to lighten the shadows and overdone it. I’m not sure. I am proud of you for the way that you are picking up on this stuff.

    It is really a great photo.

    Bob

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  2. Hi Steve – I prefer the edited version myself. My reasoning is if I had never been to this place and didn’t know that was a natural phenomenon it would like like something was wrong with the picture. But I am a little on the fence like you because of the fact that it is natural. As far as the color fringing goes I use Lightroom 3.3 and it has a tab in the develop module under lens corrections to remove the chromatic aberration. All in all still a great pic. Keep up the good work!
    P.S. Hope you’re feeling better!

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  3. Beautiful editing job!! 🙂

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  4. There is a ton more noise in the clouds/sky in the edited version.

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  5. Hi, Bob! I have continued my editing efforts (I’m nothing if not persistent!), and believe I’m making tremendous progress with the halo effect. You’re absolutely right about the shadows – I tried to lighten to bring out additional detail in the foreground. I appreciate your help, your detailed instructions, and most of all your encouragement! I’ll keep working on it and then post the final product soon. I just read a comment from Derrick that mentions a lot more noise in the sky. I’m not sure if that’s due to the lightening process or not. Other than the healing tool and the lightening – that’s all the editing I did. So, not sure why the sky changed. Honestly, I think I’m going to retrace my steps and start from the beginning on a duplicate image. I’m really learning a lot from this project and discussion! Thanks, Bob! You’re a huge help!!

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  6. Thanks for the well-wishes, Michael! I am feeling better every day! As I was just telling Bob, I’m continuing to edit and even retracing some of my steps and beginning another edit on a duplicate image. I’m making progress with the fringing through some Elements 8 editing. Stay tuned! I’ll post the final edited version. thanks for your help! Great post! Great information!

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  7. I really appreciate your kind words, Holly! Check back soon – I’m still editing and re-editing! (As opposed to over-editing!) 🙂

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  8. Hi Derrick. I was just mentioning your comment in my response to Bob. I’m not sure what happened – maybe lightening the shadows brought out additional noise. I definitely see a difference, too. I’m working on an additional edit with a duplicate image. I think with what I’ve learned in just the past few days will help me with this new edit! Thanks for your help! I’m glad you pointed out the noise. I just need to figure out how to eliminate it somewhat! Thanks! 🙂

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  9. Hey, Bob! Your blog presentation of your framed prints is amazing. Do you have a special program for that? I love the way you’re able to show them matted and framed. Great presentation.

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  10. Hi Steve. Great job on the removal. I know you said that you were going to do some further editing so I won’t be super critical. I do like the way that you brightened up the foreground rocks so that it can be seen as well as the rest of the scene. I think that a little less bright might be the ticket. The foreground rocks create a natural frame for the shot so I think that a little darker would be good.

    My first impression was that the edit looks more like a painting than a photo.

    I still love it though. Either way, it was a fantastic shot.

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  11. Nice editing, and as always, editing has side effects. But that being said, unless this were blown up gallery sized and I was two inches away from it, I’s still stick with the original, I personally rather like the effect of the phenomena 🙂 But then again, I recently put up a bright sunny shot of a building and no one noticed that when I took it it was drizzling (unless I blow it up large and have them peer at it)

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  12. You’re right, Mike, about the foreground. I’ve already changed that in some further editing. I don’t know what is happening with the sky. It does seem like a water color effect, or something. I’m not sure what I’m going to do with this shot! But, I’m really enjoying the discussion! Thanks for taking the time to share your ideas and expertise. Great job!

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  13. Photography is so subjective, Michael. It’s difficult to determine what someone else will like. So it probably is best to be the artist and let yourself create tyhe art. This has been a fantastic discussion, though. I’m very grateful for your participation! Thanks! And, great comments!!

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  14. Hi Steve. About those “framed” images in my galleries. A very dear friend of mine wrote a photoshop action for me that enabled me to do that. She is very talented in the computer/photoshop department. Not to mention that she is very generous with her time when it comes to me. I have absolutely no clue how she done it but it is custmomized to the sizes of my files that I use, and to the color of the mat. It is one of a kind and I’m very proud of it, and I am thankful more than you know, to have a friend as she. She told me once, that if she charged me for doing it, that I wouldn’t be able to afford it. 🙂 Needless to say, her and I have a real special bond.

    Bob

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  15. Hi Steve, Glad you are feeling better. I have looked and looked at
    the original phots and I can’t for the life of me see the “rain drops” that you say are there. I guess I have an untrained eye. Anyway between the two, I believe I like the original the best. Now when you are finished with the editing I might change my mind.

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  16. I voted for the original. Perhaps my opinion is predefined by what I already thought without having seen the edited version, but I really feel that the first shot seems to convey more truth and reality in a sense for me. Also, I find the edited version very slightly over sharpened and over saturated, unless there’s another reason for that?
    So for me, the first is definitely a winner ;)!

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  17. I prefer the original image all the way. I couldn’t even see the blemishes until I clicked on the picture to see the large version. I feel like the second image looks processed.

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  18. my vote is solidly for the original. I don’t mind the dark foreground so much; the key is to not have the halo effect where there’s a major contrast jump (that’s both what’s happening at the top of the ridgeline, as well as what’s happening in the clouds to make the sky look more harsh and less soft).

    if you are using Adobe Photoshop to process your images I strongly recommend experimenting with the Shadow/Highlight tool, or the Curves tool. what these let you do is raise the brightness of the shadow areas (bringing up some more detail) without getting strange effects in your accurately exposed areas.

    really great shot, one of my favorites of yours to date!

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  19. Hi Miss Betty! You will need to double click on the image to enlarge it in order to see the streaks from the raindrops. I don’t think it’s your untrained eye. 🙂 I’m still working with the shot – trying different editing to see which may be best. I really like the shot so I’m determined to save it. Thanks for joining the discussion, Miss Betty! You are always welcome.

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  20. Thanks, Kai! I’m still working with it, but who know?? I appreciate your comments. They’re very insightful and extremely helpful! Great job.

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  21. It does tend to take on that “processed” appearance, doesn’t it Karen? I’m not satisfied with it as it is here. But, I’m still working on it when I have some time. We’ll see what happens. Thanks for your comment, though! It helps!

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  22. Hi John. I’m really glad you’ve added your expertise to this discussion! I’m working with the halo/fringing effect. I’m using Photoshop Elements, but I think what you suggest can be performed in this program as well – so, I will give it a try! You have given me some specific things to try. I’ll let you know! Thanks – great comment!!!

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  23. Hello Steve, I haven’t been around much lately and missed this. First, I like the original because the color is much richer than in your edit, and as Mike pointed out,the rocks in the foreground frame the picture. But then again, it is nice not to have the ‘darts’ in the sky. Somewhere I suspect there is a happy medium. I also suspect that you will find it!

    Lots to digest I’m learning much from the comments made here by others. Recently I had wondered about that “halo” on a photo of my geese in the snow. Early AM lighting made it dark so I lightened it… apparently too much. 🙂 Now I know better!

    Thanks to Everyone!

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  24. This was really an amazing discussion that has actually covered a couple of posts. I have continued to work with the editing and hope to be able to do a photography tip about the edits in a future post. Stay tuned, Pixilated! It’s an ongoing discussion, but I’m making progress. And yes, you’ve been missed! 🙂

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